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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
, republican and democrats will handle this jobs report in their fiscal cliff negotiations? >> well, you know, you're right. some folks look at this and say the economy's strong enough. it should be able to digest big tax increases spending cuts. others look at it and say look we still have a very high unemployment rate, a long way to go to get back to full employment. the economy can't tolerate big tax increases and spending cuts. most political debates the reality is in between. we do need to address our fiscal problem so we do need to go through some spending cuts and we also need some tax revenue increases. but we have to phase it in over time, otherwise the economy will choke on that. we can't have too much restraint too quickly. so we have to phase this in, smooth it in to make it palpable for the economy. >> susie: until that happens, there is a lot of anxiety in the labor market. the big fear for many individuals and for investors is that companies are going to start laying off workers. we saw this week that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mar
in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped looking. last month's drop in u
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)